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Alex: Eco-Friendly Water Bottle that Makes Cleaning Easier

Apr 28, 2011
More people become eco-conscious and buy reusable water bottles that are not only easy on the Earth, but are also good for your health.

Alex is an innovative water bottle that is BPA-free, which means that it does not contain chemicals linked with a number of health problems, such infertility, cardiovascular problems, diabetes and others. This water bottle is made of stainless steel, but probably the best part about it is its innovative and practical design. The thing is that you can unscrew the top or a bottom part of the bottle and replace it with the half that appeals to you more either for its color or size. This design also makes cleaning much easier, which is an important advantage for longer use. The strap of the bottle is made of recycled plastic water bottles, while the color is obtained with the use of eco-friendly powder paint. The bottle is also very compact, which makes it a perfect accessory for travelling.


Alex means "Always Live Extraordinarily" and the designers hope to raise the awareness of the huge number of plastic water bottles that end up in landfills.
Alex water bottle is dishwasher safe and cleaning is really easy without the use of special brushes or tablets. The bottles are available in sizes 20, 26 and 32 ounces.

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Dec 29, 2015 02:11 AM » posted by: Meet
Mercedes Benz are no exception. Most of the newer<a href="http://darqkteqxte.com"> mdelos</a> since the mid 1990 require synthetic motor oil right from the factory. I use synthetic in all of my Mercedes Benz and specifically can attest to the benefits in the diesel<a href="http://darqkteqxte.com"> mdelos</a>; better fuel economy, easier cold weather starting on both newer and older model diesels, with less frequent oil changes. Some manufactures suggest to change oil every 10 15K miles, depending upon brand, but I maintain that every 8 10K miles is a better option. This of course depends upon driving habits, strictly highway vs. the stop and go with city driving. I was reluctant at first to switch to synthetic, given the extra cost. However, the benefits far outweigh the 35% high price per quart. What is your experience with synthetic motor oil? Have youi made the switch?

Dec 29, 2015 02:10 AM » posted by: Meet
Mercedes Benz are no exception. Most of the newer<a href="http://darqkteqxte.com"> mdelos</a> since the mid 1990 require synthetic motor oil right from the factory. I use synthetic in all of my Mercedes Benz and specifically can attest to the benefits in the diesel<a href="http://darqkteqxte.com"> mdelos</a>; better fuel economy, easier cold weather starting on both newer and older model diesels, with less frequent oil changes. Some manufactures suggest to change oil every 10 15K miles, depending upon brand, but I maintain that every 8 10K miles is a better option. This of course depends upon driving habits, strictly highway vs. the stop and go with city driving. I was reluctant at first to switch to synthetic, given the extra cost. However, the benefits far outweigh the 35% high price per quart. What is your experience with synthetic motor oil? Have youi made the switch?

Dec 29, 2015 02:10 AM » posted by: Meet
Mercedes Benz are no exception. Most of the newer<a href="http://darqkteqxte.com"> mdelos</a> since the mid 1990 require synthetic motor oil right from the factory. I use synthetic in all of my Mercedes Benz and specifically can attest to the benefits in the diesel<a href="http://darqkteqxte.com"> mdelos</a>; better fuel economy, easier cold weather starting on both newer and older model diesels, with less frequent oil changes. Some manufactures suggest to change oil every 10 15K miles, depending upon brand, but I maintain that every 8 10K miles is a better option. This of course depends upon driving habits, strictly highway vs. the stop and go with city driving. I was reluctant at first to switch to synthetic, given the extra cost. However, the benefits far outweigh the 35% high price per quart. What is your experience with synthetic motor oil? Have youi made the switch?

Dec 26, 2015 12:14 PM » posted by: Tommy
Hi MiaYes that's fine! It is ok for all levels as long as you are flaimiar with basic fragrance categories. Even if you are not you will pick it up quickly. I called it Intermediate to differentiate from my beginners class but will probably change the name in future as they are both for all levels but one is naturals only and the Intermediate also includes aromachemicals too.RegardsKaren http://qwzubhu.com [url=http://dadtwne.com]dadtwne[/url] [link=http://gtmoymb.com]gtmoymb[/link]

Dec 26, 2015 12:14 PM » posted by: Tommy
Hi MiaYes that's fine! It is ok for all levels as long as you are flaimiar with basic fragrance categories. Even if you are not you will pick it up quickly. I called it Intermediate to differentiate from my beginners class but will probably change the name in future as they are both for all levels but one is naturals only and the Intermediate also includes aromachemicals too.RegardsKaren http://qwzubhu.com [url=http://dadtwne.com]dadtwne[/url] [link=http://gtmoymb.com]gtmoymb[/link]

Dec 26, 2015 12:14 PM » posted by: Tommy
Hi MiaYes that's fine! It is ok for all levels as long as you are flaimiar with basic fragrance categories. Even if you are not you will pick it up quickly. I called it Intermediate to differentiate from my beginners class but will probably change the name in future as they are both for all levels but one is naturals only and the Intermediate also includes aromachemicals too.RegardsKaren http://qwzubhu.com [url=http://dadtwne.com]dadtwne[/url] [link=http://gtmoymb.com]gtmoymb[/link]

Dec 25, 2015 02:47 AM » posted by: Tanim
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Dec 25, 2015 02:47 AM » posted by: Tanim
Hi Karen.Unfortunately I was unaware of the<a href="http://ktlosg.com"> benngier</a> course last month, but I've just booked for Intermediate which I feel I'll be able to keep up with. I'm really looking forward to being properly introduced to the world of aromachemicals and as you say, the building blocks of perfumery.I've never been on a course like this before so will be very excited to meet likeminded people and be inspired!See you next month, regards,Freddie

Dec 25, 2015 02:47 AM » posted by: Tanim
Hi Karen.Unfortunately I was unaware of the<a href="http://ktlosg.com"> benngier</a> course last month, but I've just booked for Intermediate which I feel I'll be able to keep up with. I'm really looking forward to being properly introduced to the world of aromachemicals and as you say, the building blocks of perfumery.I've never been on a course like this before so will be very excited to meet likeminded people and be inspired!See you next month, regards,Freddie

Dec 22, 2015 10:15 PM » posted by: Annette
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Dec 22, 2015 10:15 PM » posted by: Annette
</a>I posted this awlhie back on Facebook as a response, but felt like others perusing this article should read it as well. This article didn't really answer any of the questions that I have. It actually raised more for me.For example, isn't leather a renewable resource, compared to whatever the hell they use to make synthetics?Isn't leather more durable? Therefore, aren't synthetics more likely to end up in a landfill? For example, my mom has had the same pair of leather boots since the 70s and I invested in a pair of decent leather moccasins a few years ago. Even with wearing them almost every day, they are in pristine condition. I can't say the same for my synthetic shoes, even if I paid a lot of money for them.I hate to play devil's advocate, but I am completely depressed by the lack of balanced reporting on this issue. Come on, Inhabitat!By the way, I find it kind of disgusting that you would play the child labour card. Let's look at where MOST synthetics are produced in sweatshops around the world. Go into places like Payless and you're bound to pick up a pair of shoes made by children. It has NOTHING to do with the type of material just with the garment industry in general.In my opinion, I'd rather invest in a pair of leather shoes that are going to last me for years than a pair of synthetic leather shoes that may or may not hold up which creates this disposable culture.Next, why not give some REAL alternatives? Instead of allowing this girl to freely advertise her business, let's talk about thrift stores! If you really want synthetic shoes, they've got tons of them there, and they are often better-made than what you pay for now.I'm just saying balanced articles, please! I added: That said, I don't know which is greener, but all I'm asking is that I be accurately informed.

Dec 22, 2015 10:15 PM » posted by: Annette
</a>I posted this awlhie back on Facebook as a response, but felt like others perusing this article should read it as well. This article didn't really answer any of the questions that I have. It actually raised more for me.For example, isn't leather a renewable resource, compared to whatever the hell they use to make synthetics?Isn't leather more durable? Therefore, aren't synthetics more likely to end up in a landfill? For example, my mom has had the same pair of leather boots since the 70s and I invested in a pair of decent leather moccasins a few years ago. Even with wearing them almost every day, they are in pristine condition. I can't say the same for my synthetic shoes, even if I paid a lot of money for them.I hate to play devil's advocate, but I am completely depressed by the lack of balanced reporting on this issue. Come on, Inhabitat!By the way, I find it kind of disgusting that you would play the child labour card. Let's look at where MOST synthetics are produced in sweatshops around the world. Go into places like Payless and you're bound to pick up a pair of shoes made by children. It has NOTHING to do with the type of material just with the garment industry in general.In my opinion, I'd rather invest in a pair of leather shoes that are going to last me for years than a pair of synthetic leather shoes that may or may not hold up which creates this disposable culture.Next, why not give some REAL alternatives? Instead of allowing this girl to freely advertise her business, let's talk about thrift stores! If you really want synthetic shoes, they've got tons of them there, and they are often better-made than what you pay for now.I'm just saying balanced articles, please! I added: That said, I don't know which is greener, but all I'm asking is that I be accurately informed.


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