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Being Single In Midlife Increases the Alzheimer's Risk

Jul 31, 2008
A new study found that middle-aged people who are single face the increased risk of developing dementia.

Swedish researchers point out that social interaction between partners could be a key to protecting the brain from the illness.

The study conducted at the Karolinska Institute involved 1,449 partnered and non-partnered people who were asked about their relationship status in midlife and then again after 21 years to find if they had developed dementia.

The results showed that people who remained single after divorce were three times more likely to have dementia, while singles, widowed at a young age had six times higher risk. People who were single their whole lives were twice as likely to have risk of dementia.

Overall, 139 of those in a study were diagnosed with some sort of cognitive impairment and 48 of them had Alzheimer's disease.

People who were in relationships in midlife were less likely to have cognitive impairment in comparison to non-partnered ones including those were widowed, single, divorced or separated.

Even after other factors such as weight, physical activity and education were taken into account, the results showed that those with a partner had had a 50 percent lower risk of developing the illness later in life.

Dr Krister Hakansson, a leading author of the study explained that cognitive and intellectual stimulation is known to be protective against dementia. Dr Hakansson added: "Living in a couple means that you are confronted with other ideas, perspectives and needs. You have to compromise, make decisions and solve problems together with someone else, which is more complicated and challenging. It is probably easier to get stuck in your own habits and routines if you live by yourself."

The Alzheimer's Research Trust said the findings were worrying, taking into account the high divorce rates and ageing population in the UK.

The results of the study will be released at the Alzheimer's Association 2008 International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease in Chicago.


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Jun 13, 2016 02:41 AM » posted by: Chealen Williams Charles
Please there is a cure for dementia and no one knows. This is my husband’s story... My husband was a retired force man, he had partial stroke 5 years ago, and then i was still working. His condition got worse and he was hospitalized. After some time of treatment he began to behave abnormal, like someone who has lost memory of event and occurrence. i shared tears the very day i walked to him in the hospital and he could not even recognize me. This is am man that is very playful and highly romantic. Each day i hold him to myself and share tears the more. He was not able to do anything just look at me like a bull dog and do so many abnormal things. Later on doctor brought a recent report and he was diagnosed of dementia this doctor says have no cure that he would die a brainless man. Oh my God i fainted when i heard this. I raised my voice and cry to God to help me from this. So i began to hope and trust God to do miracle. My pastor was a great pillar of encouragement to me. i did all i can to get a cure for him, but none worked out, i spent thousands of USD trying to get a cure for him. But behold a friends doctor came visiting and said to me let’s look if herbal remedy can help him get any better so he gave me your website which is www. drisimhenmhenherbalhome.com there i saw how people testified of the good works of herbs in their life, so i decided to contact the doctor because his contact details was on his website.. The first time i emailed him, i got no reply from him, so i decided to call him on the phone. I called him, and told him what he could do was to laugh and said to me that anything the enemy have planned against my husband must fail, he said to me that he have cured CJD and this is similar to what my husband have. After all, he prepared herbs and sent to me, i have to force my husband to take it because before then he was not taking anything from me to eat anymore. but behold sir it was just like a magic gradually my husband begin to get better, better and today sir i am proud to say my husband is totally cured, He you cured my husband of this deadly dementia disease and now i keep my promise i made to him before the cure that i will let the entire world know about his herbs if my husband is cured. Sir, now i am overwhelmed. God bless you sir. My husband has the plans to travel to see the doctor facially and say a physical thanks to him in his country, and i will accompany him down to his home in his country to also show my gratitude him. God bless him in abundant. If you have same problem or have other health issues and want to contact Doctor Isimhenmhen Anthony, here is his website (http://drisimhenmhenherbalhome.com)

Oct 26, 2015 11:43 AM » posted by: Tatiane
This is incredibly dicffiult because many (potential) sufferers may be covering up and while knowing their memory is not so good, not wishing to admit to this. Loss of memory in the elderly is still seen as a stigma (all those old ladies shouting out in geriatric wards!). It takes a skilled practitioner to make a diagnosis in the early stages, particularly in younger, early-onset dementia cases. The approach advocated above, while sympathetic, is just simply what they don't want to hear or admit to, leading to outright denial. Usually because it may evoke memories of someone in a previous generation who went funny in old age, and the person is scared stiff that their worst fears about themselves are going to be realised.Similarly: another huge dicffiulty is that the person affected is likely to be in denial anyway that something is wrong and simply refuses to discuss it. They feel they are being pushed by members of the family to be put somewhere when manifestly they cannot cope in the home on their own any longer. To get a possible dementia subject to see the doctor in the early stages when the condition is suspected is a really dicffiult job. Not many GPs will come out to visit either. If GPs were trained to watch out for this in the elderly (certainly over 80) for any routine appts with the doctor (eg blood tests etc) and then able to suggest to a relative that they bring the subject to see the doctor asap for a thorough check-over, this would help. Far too many younger relatives are trying to cope with older members with undiagnosed dementia, either at home, or at a distance, which is not good for the patient or the family.

Oct 26, 2015 11:43 AM » posted by: Tatiane
This is incredibly dicffiult because many (potential) sufferers may be covering up and while knowing their memory is not so good, not wishing to admit to this. Loss of memory in the elderly is still seen as a stigma (all those old ladies shouting out in geriatric wards!). It takes a skilled practitioner to make a diagnosis in the early stages, particularly in younger, early-onset dementia cases. The approach advocated above, while sympathetic, is just simply what they don't want to hear or admit to, leading to outright denial. Usually because it may evoke memories of someone in a previous generation who went funny in old age, and the person is scared stiff that their worst fears about themselves are going to be realised.Similarly: another huge dicffiulty is that the person affected is likely to be in denial anyway that something is wrong and simply refuses to discuss it. They feel they are being pushed by members of the family to be put somewhere when manifestly they cannot cope in the home on their own any longer. To get a possible dementia subject to see the doctor in the early stages when the condition is suspected is a really dicffiult job. Not many GPs will come out to visit either. If GPs were trained to watch out for this in the elderly (certainly over 80) for any routine appts with the doctor (eg blood tests etc) and then able to suggest to a relative that they bring the subject to see the doctor asap for a thorough check-over, this would help. Far too many younger relatives are trying to cope with older members with undiagnosed dementia, either at home, or at a distance, which is not good for the patient or the family.

Oct 26, 2015 11:43 AM » posted by: Tatiane
This is incredibly dicffiult because many (potential) sufferers may be covering up and while knowing their memory is not so good, not wishing to admit to this. Loss of memory in the elderly is still seen as a stigma (all those old ladies shouting out in geriatric wards!). It takes a skilled practitioner to make a diagnosis in the early stages, particularly in younger, early-onset dementia cases. The approach advocated above, while sympathetic, is just simply what they don't want to hear or admit to, leading to outright denial. Usually because it may evoke memories of someone in a previous generation who went funny in old age, and the person is scared stiff that their worst fears about themselves are going to be realised.Similarly: another huge dicffiulty is that the person affected is likely to be in denial anyway that something is wrong and simply refuses to discuss it. They feel they are being pushed by members of the family to be put somewhere when manifestly they cannot cope in the home on their own any longer. To get a possible dementia subject to see the doctor in the early stages when the condition is suspected is a really dicffiult job. Not many GPs will come out to visit either. If GPs were trained to watch out for this in the elderly (certainly over 80) for any routine appts with the doctor (eg blood tests etc) and then able to suggest to a relative that they bring the subject to see the doctor asap for a thorough check-over, this would help. Far too many younger relatives are trying to cope with older members with undiagnosed dementia, either at home, or at a distance, which is not good for the patient or the family.

Jul 31, 2008 06:10 PM » posted by: benajnim
Basic statistics: correlation is not causation.


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