Birth Control

63
votes
Dec 11, 2009
Most condom failures happen because of the incorrect use of the condom, rather than defects in the condom itself. The condom breakage or slippage may lead the risk of unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. That's why it is important to use condom correctly, avoiding the most common mistakes with condom use:

19
votes
Aug 05, 2009
Scientists claim that having sex without condom can actually be good for man's and woman's mental health.

A study conducted by Professor Stuart Brody, of the West of Scotland University, Paisley and his team revealed that sexual relationships without condom use were linked to better mental health for both partners.

21
votes
Oct 01, 2007

It is still quite disputable if men would take birth control pills to share responsibility with women while latest researches suggest several options for men. The second conference called "Future of male Contraception" in Seattle that was supported by National Institutes Of Health and WHO presented the newest developments in the field of male contraception.

13
votes
Sep 23, 2009
Many women choose the birth control pills to prevent unwanted pregnancy. The pill is considered to be safe and reversible birth control method with 99 percent effectiveness. However, the failure rate of the pill can be from 12 to 20 percent if it is used incorrectly. This might be due to the fact that women forget to take the pill or are confused about its proper use.

13
votes
Feb 14, 2009
Many women are concerned about future pregnancy long before they choose birth control pills. Can birth control pills affect woman's fertility? And how long should you wait after you stop taking the pill?

13
votes
Jan 13, 2009
Do birth control methods affect woman's libido? Many women who experience decreased sex drive may not readily associate their sexual problems with birth control method they choose. However, several studies indicate that there might be a connection between contraceptive method and fluctuations of sex drive in women.

9
votes
Jun 11, 2009
Condom is one of the most popular barrier birth control methods for men. It is effective against sexually transmitted diseases and unwanted pregnancy, being also convenient, when used correctly.

8
votes
Sep 18, 2009
Female condom is a barrier method of contraception, which can be used for protection against unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. The condom represents a polyurethane sheath that covers vagina and cervix, preventing sperm from entering the vagina.

8
votes
Dec 01, 2008
For years researchers tried to find a male birth control pill, to give men an opportunity to share the responsibility for family planning. The development of male birth control has become even closer with the recent studies conducted at the University of Washington in Seattle. The researchers introduced male hormonal contraceptive that could be soon available in the form of injectible, implant or pill.


6
votes
Dec 10, 2008
Women may soon use contraceptive pills without side effects linked to hormonal contraception, a new study says.

Scientists at the Karolinska Institute in Huddinge, Sweden discovered that protein found in the coating of the mammalian eggs can become an obstacle to conception, the NewScientist reports. The protein called ZP3, takes part in conception and is essential in sperm binding. In other words, sperm needs to bind to ZP3 protein to get through the coating of the egg.

6
votes
Oct 18, 2007
The completely new technique that is called RNA interference (RNAi) affecting the gene that is active in eggs before they can be fertilized by sperm. When the ZP3 gene is switched off by RNAi method, the egg develops without outer membrane where sperm connects to the egg for conception.

3
votes
Nov 23, 2011
The new hormonal contraceptive Nexplanon that provides three years of protection from unwanted pregnancy is available for women in the US. The new contraceptive is progestin-only single-rod implant that is inserted under woman's skin during a simple procedure. It looks like a flexible matchstick, made of polymer.

4
votes
Jul 24, 2009
For many years specialists were dubious about withdrawal method, considering it far less effective than such birth control methods as condoms. However, the recent study published in the June issue of the journal Contraception says that many experts might underestimate withdrawal method for preventing unwanted pregnancy.

4
votes
Jun 05, 2009
Birth control pills are commonly used by a great number of women who need a reliable form of contraception. Birth control pills are available in various forms and brands, like combined pills, progestin-only pills, morning-after pill and extended cycle pills. All birth control pills have a number of side effects ranging from the mild to more serious ones.

4
votes
Mar 17, 2009
Birth control pill is known to be 92 to 99 % effective in preventing pregnancy. However, you may hear a number of stories, when women got pregnant while on the pill. Many women are concerned about the risk of getting pregnant using birth control pills and what can be done to prevent the failure.

3
votes
Nov 30, 2010
There is a common belief that a woman loses her sex drive once she starts taking the birth control pill. It is estimated that the combination pill, that contains synthetic form of estrogen and progestin can reduce the level of testosterone, which is responsible for our sex drive.

3
votes
Oct 26, 2010
There is a lot of debate about the side effects of birth control pill. Millions of women use the Pill, but still many of us wish they had a better alternative to prevent unwanted pregnancy.

3
votes
Apr 28, 2010
Condoms are one of the most common birth control options that offer protection against STD's and unplanned pregnancy. However, many men and women are reluctant to use condom because they think that interferes with the moment during sex, especially when the condom is difficult to put on.

3
votes
Apr 23, 2010
Women, who report about decreased sex drive, may need to reconsider taking antidepressants and the birth control pills, a new research suggests.

3
votes
Mar 12, 2010
Women, who take birth control pills have lower mortality rate from any cause, including heart disease and different types of cancer, a new study suggests.



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