1
votes

G2 Fit Self-Guiding Eco-Friendly Fitness Mats

Jul 09, 2010
If you decided to become fitter, but do not know where to start from, there is a good and simple fitness option that will help you exercise without the need of a personal trainer.

G2 Fit Self-Guiding Eco-Friendly Fitness Mats are designed for everyone, who needs some motivation and guidance to become slimmer, stronger and healthier.

G2 Fitness Mats are special mats that have illustrated stretch and exercise programs printed on them. There is a wide range of G2 Fit Self-Guiding Eco-Friendly Fitness Mats featuring yoga poses, abdominal exercises, stretch fitness, pilates and others.

The mats have illustrated programs for men and women.  All you have to do is to look at the illustrations on the mat and exercise.

G2 Fitness mats are made of eco-friendly, bacteria-resistant and washable material. The mat has thick cushion design with non-slip floor grip to make sure you focus on exercising and not on discomfort of dealing with your mat.

If you want to improve your training or simple want a more detailed instructions, you can watch instructional videos online by entering passcode that you get after purchasing the G2 Fit Eco-Friendly Fitness Mats.

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Oct 27, 2015 03:54 PM » posted by: Tadanori
</a>Thank you for all of your great comments and<a href="http://nqnrlj.com"> qonitsues</a>, I am very happy to address them.Leather is not ecological. Many of you have been asking<a href="http://nqnrlj.com"> qonitsues</a> about this subject and passing the info on. This is great! I will answer and clarify wherever I can. To start: leather is not a naturally occurring item. It is a processed product created from the skins of animals. Skin is composed of cells, protein, collagen, etc., that decompose when no longer living. To make leather, skins are put through the process of tanning, to preserve the skins and allow pliability. One question asked about pre-industrial tanning, how was it done? We would assume the traditional method would be sans chemicals and ecologically sounder.Tanning has been done for centuries. It was arduous, time consuming work, and was/is extremely noxious smelling. The chemicals used were of more natural means in pre-industrial times. Today’s toxic tanning chemicals replace: urine (often human), feces (dog & pigeon), brains (from the animal), alkaline salts, alum, tannin (from tree bark) etc. These various bodily fluids contain chemicals within them that caused putrefaction of the skin that was needed for creating leather. Traditional tanneries are extremely rare today, possibly not a surprise. Local tanneries using local cattle was brought up in a question, most likely they are utilizing the chemicals available today that are poisoning waterways, soil, and the atmosphere as well. I would call and inquire about their process.Durability of synthetics: Leather is very durable yes, considering all the chemicals used to preserve it. Ultrasuede is an excellent alternative to leather/suede that we use often. Unlike suede, ultrasuede can be spot cleaned. It has the look and feel of real suede, if that is of importance to you. It is very durable as it is being used as upholstery for furniture, car interiors, apparel, has breathability, and is stain-resistant. It really is superior to suede/leather. Otherwise OlsenHaus is constantly looking for the most durable eco materials to create with. All in all, it comes down to the individual’s opinion, and then subsequent choice. Take the information you have about the leather industry (please investigate for yourself as well) and the information you have on any ecologically aware company working for the environment rather than against. Choose from there. Your dollar is your vote.

Oct 27, 2015 03:54 PM » posted by: Tadanori
</a>Thank you for all of your great comments and<a href="http://nqnrlj.com"> qonitsues</a>, I am very happy to address them.Leather is not ecological. Many of you have been asking<a href="http://nqnrlj.com"> qonitsues</a> about this subject and passing the info on. This is great! I will answer and clarify wherever I can. To start: leather is not a naturally occurring item. It is a processed product created from the skins of animals. Skin is composed of cells, protein, collagen, etc., that decompose when no longer living. To make leather, skins are put through the process of tanning, to preserve the skins and allow pliability. One question asked about pre-industrial tanning, how was it done? We would assume the traditional method would be sans chemicals and ecologically sounder.Tanning has been done for centuries. It was arduous, time consuming work, and was/is extremely noxious smelling. The chemicals used were of more natural means in pre-industrial times. Today’s toxic tanning chemicals replace: urine (often human), feces (dog & pigeon), brains (from the animal), alkaline salts, alum, tannin (from tree bark) etc. These various bodily fluids contain chemicals within them that caused putrefaction of the skin that was needed for creating leather. Traditional tanneries are extremely rare today, possibly not a surprise. Local tanneries using local cattle was brought up in a question, most likely they are utilizing the chemicals available today that are poisoning waterways, soil, and the atmosphere as well. I would call and inquire about their process.Durability of synthetics: Leather is very durable yes, considering all the chemicals used to preserve it. Ultrasuede is an excellent alternative to leather/suede that we use often. Unlike suede, ultrasuede can be spot cleaned. It has the look and feel of real suede, if that is of importance to you. It is very durable as it is being used as upholstery for furniture, car interiors, apparel, has breathability, and is stain-resistant. It really is superior to suede/leather. Otherwise OlsenHaus is constantly looking for the most durable eco materials to create with. All in all, it comes down to the individual’s opinion, and then subsequent choice. Take the information you have about the leather industry (please investigate for yourself as well) and the information you have on any ecologically aware company working for the environment rather than against. Choose from there. Your dollar is your vote.

Oct 27, 2015 03:54 PM » posted by: Tadanori
</a>Thank you for all of your great comments and<a href="http://nqnrlj.com"> qonitsues</a>, I am very happy to address them.Leather is not ecological. Many of you have been asking<a href="http://nqnrlj.com"> qonitsues</a> about this subject and passing the info on. This is great! I will answer and clarify wherever I can. To start: leather is not a naturally occurring item. It is a processed product created from the skins of animals. Skin is composed of cells, protein, collagen, etc., that decompose when no longer living. To make leather, skins are put through the process of tanning, to preserve the skins and allow pliability. One question asked about pre-industrial tanning, how was it done? We would assume the traditional method would be sans chemicals and ecologically sounder.Tanning has been done for centuries. It was arduous, time consuming work, and was/is extremely noxious smelling. The chemicals used were of more natural means in pre-industrial times. Today’s toxic tanning chemicals replace: urine (often human), feces (dog & pigeon), brains (from the animal), alkaline salts, alum, tannin (from tree bark) etc. These various bodily fluids contain chemicals within them that caused putrefaction of the skin that was needed for creating leather. Traditional tanneries are extremely rare today, possibly not a surprise. Local tanneries using local cattle was brought up in a question, most likely they are utilizing the chemicals available today that are poisoning waterways, soil, and the atmosphere as well. I would call and inquire about their process.Durability of synthetics: Leather is very durable yes, considering all the chemicals used to preserve it. Ultrasuede is an excellent alternative to leather/suede that we use often. Unlike suede, ultrasuede can be spot cleaned. It has the look and feel of real suede, if that is of importance to you. It is very durable as it is being used as upholstery for furniture, car interiors, apparel, has breathability, and is stain-resistant. It really is superior to suede/leather. Otherwise OlsenHaus is constantly looking for the most durable eco materials to create with. All in all, it comes down to the individual’s opinion, and then subsequent choice. Take the information you have about the leather industry (please investigate for yourself as well) and the information you have on any ecologically aware company working for the environment rather than against. Choose from there. Your dollar is your vote.

Oct 26, 2015 10:41 AM » posted by: Carlos
Love it! so excited you post the toaruitl and i love how you did it in photo form. now what can i make them for? hmmmm gotta figure that one out still.

Oct 26, 2015 10:40 AM » posted by: Carlos
Love it! so excited you post the toaruitl and i love how you did it in photo form. now what can i make them for? hmmmm gotta figure that one out still.

Oct 26, 2015 10:40 AM » posted by: Carlos
Love it! so excited you post the toaruitl and i love how you did it in photo form. now what can i make them for? hmmmm gotta figure that one out still.


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