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Food Illness Comes From "Healthy" Food in Restaurants

Aug 19, 2007
Most people think that the so-called healthy food in the restaurants is really healthy. In fact, according to a study on the data gathered from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, such food like lettuce, uncooked vegetables, seafood, and ethnic food can be the main cause of the foodborne illness, which is a food infection that is caused by pathogenic bacteria, viruses, prions or parasites. Usually this contamination occurs due to improper handling, preparation, or food storage.

Healthinspections.com made an analysis which showed that the main cause of food poisoning in the restaurants across the United States were lettuce-based salads, tomatoes, and vegetables. The second place was held by seafood and ethnic foods.

According to Healthinspections.com, in 2005 there were 49 outbreaks of food poisoning in the United States. These were caused by lettuce-based salads, tomatoes, and vegetables served in the restaurants. It is worth mentioning that food can be easily contaminated if handled with unwashed hands. As for the seafood and ethnic food served in the U.S. restaurants then, according to the data, in 2005 these caused 43 outbreaks of foodborne illness.

Healthy Life Spot




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Oct 19, 2012 03:29 PM » posted by: Nour
It turns out driving long dicasntes to urban Farmers Markets isn't all that uncommon most of the good nearby land is expensive and mostly given over to growing houses (bye, bye Garden State ) and for far flung rural farmers urban markets are where the economic activity is, and it's well worth the trip. According to a recent investigation of major US Farmers Markets by a national farmers market organization the Greenmarket in NYC has producers traveling up to 310 miles; Seattle and Austin 250; etc. And longer hauls aren't all that uncommon in sparsely populated areas out West Texas and Montana particularly. I know an organic fruit grower who is a mainstay of the Boulder Farmers Market in Colorado who makes weekly tractor-trailer trip from his farm in Fruta some 275 miles away over the Rocky Mountains Continental Divide on the western slope of CO Most worrisome to small farm organizations and the farmers, gardeners and consumers they represent is that somehow lost in all this legislative discussion is the fact that food safety already is a major concern and consideration for farmer/producers their livelihood depends on it and they are already subject to a wide array of state and local health department and ag agency food safety oversight. Heaping more paperwork, overextended regulation, intervention and expensive compliance requirements on the backs of small farmers who can least afford them does not necessarily achieve enhancements in food safety or protect consumers but they can easily squelch the local food movement and put the farmers out of business. Rather than than relying on some kind of broad-brush bureaucratic regulatory oversight exercises from an agency (FDA) who admits to having very little experience or expertise concerning what goes on on the farm the best approach for achieving a safe food supply is to help farmers do the best job possible.This needs to be achieved through training, education, and empowering farmers and their farm workers to understand and manage the risks that can enter the process at critical control points which exist in their operations. Senator Stabenow's Amendment within S.510 is a great step forward toward realizing this educational component and is designed to provide the necessary public funding to do this.Consumers should also keep in mind that food safety has been neatly delineated and categorized to only include microbial contamination when we are all are being subjected to a daily onslaught of toxic pesticides/hormonal/chemical/ etc cocktails that are ubiquitous and FDA/EPA/USDA approved in the industrialized food supply.Clearly, consumers understand that local farms and food are a small but growing alternative to the inherently risky industrial food system. Senator Tester's amendment creates an alternate food safety regimen that provides realistic oversight without throwing the baby out with the bathwater.thank you,Steve Gilman


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