3
votes

SmartSense Shawl Protects Women from Radiation

May 26, 2011
If you are concerned about everyday radiation, which, in fact, became the inevitable part of our life, then you will need an anti-radiation shield to protect your body from unnecessary radiation.

Cell phones, WiFi, microwaves, computers and numerous gadgets just to name a few are around us all day long.

SmartSense company that actually comprises of two women, who are worried about the level of radiation nowadays, came up with a the SmartSense Shawl, a wrap that should be worn to reduce radiation exposure, which is especially important for pregnant women or those who is worried about the risk of getting breast cancer.

The Shawl is made of cotton fibers and specially designed fabric that has anti-radioactive properties. The company also offers SmartCovers that can be used to cover the devices, like microwaves.

Read more at [SmartSenseCovers.com]


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Oct 27, 2015 10:00 PM » posted by: Khem
PIZZA: Lean Cuisine Brick Oven Style Roasted Garlic Chicken PizzaHere's a great way to soothe pizza crvnaig without worrying about the 2-slice cut-off! The flatbread crust is topped with creamy garlic sauce, chicken, and cheese. And it crisps up perfectly in the microwave.340 calories, 7g fat (2g saturated), 49g carbohydrates, 670mg sodium, 2g fiber, 20g proteinENCHILADAS: Amy's Black Bean and Vegetable EnchiladasDig into two corn tortillas filled with black beans, corn, zucchini, tofu, and bell peppers, all covered in mild enchilada sauce. Note that there's a low-sodium version of this meal: 380 mg vs. 780 mg in the regular recipe. Smart. High salt hits are hard to avoid in most frozen food, so take advantage.380 calories, 12g fat (1g saturated), 44g carbohydrate, 380mg sodium, 6g fiber, 10g proteinBURRITO: Cedarlane's Low Fat Beans, Rice, and Cheese Style BurritoThis almost sounds too healthy to be fun, but even our burrito junkies loved this dish of pinto beans, soy cheddar cheese, tomatoes, and organic brown rice, wrapped in a warm wheat tortilla. For extra zing, top it off with your favorite salsa.260 calories, 1g fat (0g saturated), 48g carbohydrate, 490mg sodium, 7g fiber, 13g proteinPANINI: Lean Cuisine's Chicken, Spinach, and Mushroom PaniniOkay, it's not quite the same as the corner bistro's, but a little perspective here: eating just half of Panera Bread's Frontega Chicken Panini would cost you 440 calories, 21g of fat, and 1150mg of sodium! This is faster, cheaper, much healthier, and surprisingly satisfying.280 calories, 8g fat (3.5g saturated), 32g carbohydrate, 690mg sodium, 5g fiber, 21g proteinTHAI NOODLES: Seeds of Change Spicy Thai Peanut NoodlesYou don't have to be a nutritionist to figure that large servings of noodles drenched in peanut sauce are hazardous to your waist. Not these. The linguini is made with healthy semolina wheat flour, and there's plenty of zippy ginger-peanut sauce flavoring the noodles, veggies, and tofu (done just right nice and firm).350 calories, 9g fat (3g saturated), 620mg sodium, 51g carbohydrate, 4g fiber, 17g proteinRAVIOLI: Lean Cuisine Butternut Squash RavioliThis indulgent-tasting dish features pillowy squash raviolis with a creamy pumpkin-like filling, surrounded by yellow and orange carrots, snap peas, and chopped walnuts, all covered with a light cream sauce. Bonus: It gives you almost all the vitamin A you need for the whole day.350 calories, 9g fat (3g saturated), 56g carbohydrates, 660mg sodium, 6g fiber, 13g proteinMAC N' CHEESE: Smart Ones Macaroni and CheeseEvery now and then you need a taste of your favorite childhood dish. If mac and cheese is yours, this one will soothe your inner 5-year-old's needs for just 270 warm, creamy calories.270 calories, 2g fat (1g saturated), 52g carbohydrates, 790mg sodium, 2g fiber, 11g proteinSOMETHING DIFFERENT: Kashi Lemongrass Coconut ChickenA delicious bowl of tender snow peas, carrots, broccoli, and grilled chicken breast on a bed of seven whole grains that are flavored with a lemongrass-coconut sauce this meal smells almost as good as it tastes.300 calories, 8g fat (4g saturated), 38g carbohydrate, 680mg sodium, 7g of fiber, 18g protein http://ftgoiv.com [url=http://ojxbqhvhj.com]ojxbqhvhj[/url] [link=http://ylmvafxoxw.com]ylmvafxoxw[/link]

Oct 27, 2015 10:00 PM » posted by: Khem
PIZZA: Lean Cuisine Brick Oven Style Roasted Garlic Chicken PizzaHere's a great way to soothe pizza crvnaig without worrying about the 2-slice cut-off! The flatbread crust is topped with creamy garlic sauce, chicken, and cheese. And it crisps up perfectly in the microwave.340 calories, 7g fat (2g saturated), 49g carbohydrates, 670mg sodium, 2g fiber, 20g proteinENCHILADAS: Amy's Black Bean and Vegetable EnchiladasDig into two corn tortillas filled with black beans, corn, zucchini, tofu, and bell peppers, all covered in mild enchilada sauce. Note that there's a low-sodium version of this meal: 380 mg vs. 780 mg in the regular recipe. Smart. High salt hits are hard to avoid in most frozen food, so take advantage.380 calories, 12g fat (1g saturated), 44g carbohydrate, 380mg sodium, 6g fiber, 10g proteinBURRITO: Cedarlane's Low Fat Beans, Rice, and Cheese Style BurritoThis almost sounds too healthy to be fun, but even our burrito junkies loved this dish of pinto beans, soy cheddar cheese, tomatoes, and organic brown rice, wrapped in a warm wheat tortilla. For extra zing, top it off with your favorite salsa.260 calories, 1g fat (0g saturated), 48g carbohydrate, 490mg sodium, 7g fiber, 13g proteinPANINI: Lean Cuisine's Chicken, Spinach, and Mushroom PaniniOkay, it's not quite the same as the corner bistro's, but a little perspective here: eating just half of Panera Bread's Frontega Chicken Panini would cost you 440 calories, 21g of fat, and 1150mg of sodium! This is faster, cheaper, much healthier, and surprisingly satisfying.280 calories, 8g fat (3.5g saturated), 32g carbohydrate, 690mg sodium, 5g fiber, 21g proteinTHAI NOODLES: Seeds of Change Spicy Thai Peanut NoodlesYou don't have to be a nutritionist to figure that large servings of noodles drenched in peanut sauce are hazardous to your waist. Not these. The linguini is made with healthy semolina wheat flour, and there's plenty of zippy ginger-peanut sauce flavoring the noodles, veggies, and tofu (done just right nice and firm).350 calories, 9g fat (3g saturated), 620mg sodium, 51g carbohydrate, 4g fiber, 17g proteinRAVIOLI: Lean Cuisine Butternut Squash RavioliThis indulgent-tasting dish features pillowy squash raviolis with a creamy pumpkin-like filling, surrounded by yellow and orange carrots, snap peas, and chopped walnuts, all covered with a light cream sauce. Bonus: It gives you almost all the vitamin A you need for the whole day.350 calories, 9g fat (3g saturated), 56g carbohydrates, 660mg sodium, 6g fiber, 13g proteinMAC N' CHEESE: Smart Ones Macaroni and CheeseEvery now and then you need a taste of your favorite childhood dish. If mac and cheese is yours, this one will soothe your inner 5-year-old's needs for just 270 warm, creamy calories.270 calories, 2g fat (1g saturated), 52g carbohydrates, 790mg sodium, 2g fiber, 11g proteinSOMETHING DIFFERENT: Kashi Lemongrass Coconut ChickenA delicious bowl of tender snow peas, carrots, broccoli, and grilled chicken breast on a bed of seven whole grains that are flavored with a lemongrass-coconut sauce this meal smells almost as good as it tastes.300 calories, 8g fat (4g saturated), 38g carbohydrate, 680mg sodium, 7g of fiber, 18g protein http://ftgoiv.com [url=http://ojxbqhvhj.com]ojxbqhvhj[/url] [link=http://ylmvafxoxw.com]ylmvafxoxw[/link]

Oct 27, 2015 09:59 PM » posted by: Khem
PIZZA: Lean Cuisine Brick Oven Style Roasted Garlic Chicken PizzaHere's a great way to soothe pizza crvnaig without worrying about the 2-slice cut-off! The flatbread crust is topped with creamy garlic sauce, chicken, and cheese. And it crisps up perfectly in the microwave.340 calories, 7g fat (2g saturated), 49g carbohydrates, 670mg sodium, 2g fiber, 20g proteinENCHILADAS: Amy's Black Bean and Vegetable EnchiladasDig into two corn tortillas filled with black beans, corn, zucchini, tofu, and bell peppers, all covered in mild enchilada sauce. Note that there's a low-sodium version of this meal: 380 mg vs. 780 mg in the regular recipe. Smart. High salt hits are hard to avoid in most frozen food, so take advantage.380 calories, 12g fat (1g saturated), 44g carbohydrate, 380mg sodium, 6g fiber, 10g proteinBURRITO: Cedarlane's Low Fat Beans, Rice, and Cheese Style BurritoThis almost sounds too healthy to be fun, but even our burrito junkies loved this dish of pinto beans, soy cheddar cheese, tomatoes, and organic brown rice, wrapped in a warm wheat tortilla. For extra zing, top it off with your favorite salsa.260 calories, 1g fat (0g saturated), 48g carbohydrate, 490mg sodium, 7g fiber, 13g proteinPANINI: Lean Cuisine's Chicken, Spinach, and Mushroom PaniniOkay, it's not quite the same as the corner bistro's, but a little perspective here: eating just half of Panera Bread's Frontega Chicken Panini would cost you 440 calories, 21g of fat, and 1150mg of sodium! This is faster, cheaper, much healthier, and surprisingly satisfying.280 calories, 8g fat (3.5g saturated), 32g carbohydrate, 690mg sodium, 5g fiber, 21g proteinTHAI NOODLES: Seeds of Change Spicy Thai Peanut NoodlesYou don't have to be a nutritionist to figure that large servings of noodles drenched in peanut sauce are hazardous to your waist. Not these. The linguini is made with healthy semolina wheat flour, and there's plenty of zippy ginger-peanut sauce flavoring the noodles, veggies, and tofu (done just right nice and firm).350 calories, 9g fat (3g saturated), 620mg sodium, 51g carbohydrate, 4g fiber, 17g proteinRAVIOLI: Lean Cuisine Butternut Squash RavioliThis indulgent-tasting dish features pillowy squash raviolis with a creamy pumpkin-like filling, surrounded by yellow and orange carrots, snap peas, and chopped walnuts, all covered with a light cream sauce. Bonus: It gives you almost all the vitamin A you need for the whole day.350 calories, 9g fat (3g saturated), 56g carbohydrates, 660mg sodium, 6g fiber, 13g proteinMAC N' CHEESE: Smart Ones Macaroni and CheeseEvery now and then you need a taste of your favorite childhood dish. If mac and cheese is yours, this one will soothe your inner 5-year-old's needs for just 270 warm, creamy calories.270 calories, 2g fat (1g saturated), 52g carbohydrates, 790mg sodium, 2g fiber, 11g proteinSOMETHING DIFFERENT: Kashi Lemongrass Coconut ChickenA delicious bowl of tender snow peas, carrots, broccoli, and grilled chicken breast on a bed of seven whole grains that are flavored with a lemongrass-coconut sauce this meal smells almost as good as it tastes.300 calories, 8g fat (4g saturated), 38g carbohydrate, 680mg sodium, 7g of fiber, 18g protein http://ftgoiv.com [url=http://ojxbqhvhj.com]ojxbqhvhj[/url] [link=http://ylmvafxoxw.com]ylmvafxoxw[/link]

Oct 26, 2015 01:31 PM » posted by: Ali
"Copy Paste" response is blialirnt but he would do well not to plagiarise other peoples responses!!!!!!!!The fact is that exposure to microwave radiation for extended periods may well cause certain cancers to occur. They may also cause cataracts, birth defects and other serious health problems including nervous system damage, headaches, and pacemaker interference.However, new ovens are typically designed so as not to exceed 1mW/cm2 of radiated power. In addition, any leak that exceeds 5mW/cm2 at a distance of 2 inches from a microwave oven is considered to be dangerous and the oven should not be used. Ovens can deteriorate over time and should be checked to ensure that these limits are not exceeded.This can be done by your local service centre or you can purchase an earth leakage detector and have it on hand to keep a regular maintenance check of your oven. If an oven is in good condition then it would present no more risk then anything else around your home such as eating processed food, using mobile phones, living near HV power lines, or living in your house which exposes you to electromagnetic radiation from the electrical wiring. Also, as I had indicated in an earlier posting;the other aspect and some area of concern is the safety of eating foods from a microwave. This really depends on the containers used to heat the food in. Some plastics, for instance, are more prone to the effect of "migration". whereby some additives used in plastics are more likely to migrate to foods more than others. The main concern in the past has been in connection with plasticisers which are used to improve the flexibility of some packaging materials. As the tendency for plasticisers to migrate increases at higher temperatures, only those plastics specifically designed for oven use are suitable for cooking. To reduce any possible risk one should;* Use only microwave-safe utensils.* While some packaging films may be labelled 'microwave-safe' care should be taken to avoid direct contact with the food when using them to cover containers or to reheat dinners on plates.* As migration is more likely to occur into hot fatty foods, glass containers are a suitable choice for heating these products. As yet there are no standards for claims such as "microwave safe"; if you are in doubt as to the safety of such materials contact the manufacturer or use a ceramic/glass alternative.In the end, I guess time will tell as to what other possible adverse effects, microwave ovens may have on our lifes!

Oct 26, 2015 01:31 PM » posted by: Ali
"Copy Paste" response is blialirnt but he would do well not to plagiarise other peoples responses!!!!!!!!The fact is that exposure to microwave radiation for extended periods may well cause certain cancers to occur. They may also cause cataracts, birth defects and other serious health problems including nervous system damage, headaches, and pacemaker interference.However, new ovens are typically designed so as not to exceed 1mW/cm2 of radiated power. In addition, any leak that exceeds 5mW/cm2 at a distance of 2 inches from a microwave oven is considered to be dangerous and the oven should not be used. Ovens can deteriorate over time and should be checked to ensure that these limits are not exceeded.This can be done by your local service centre or you can purchase an earth leakage detector and have it on hand to keep a regular maintenance check of your oven. If an oven is in good condition then it would present no more risk then anything else around your home such as eating processed food, using mobile phones, living near HV power lines, or living in your house which exposes you to electromagnetic radiation from the electrical wiring. Also, as I had indicated in an earlier posting;the other aspect and some area of concern is the safety of eating foods from a microwave. This really depends on the containers used to heat the food in. Some plastics, for instance, are more prone to the effect of "migration". whereby some additives used in plastics are more likely to migrate to foods more than others. The main concern in the past has been in connection with plasticisers which are used to improve the flexibility of some packaging materials. As the tendency for plasticisers to migrate increases at higher temperatures, only those plastics specifically designed for oven use are suitable for cooking. To reduce any possible risk one should;* Use only microwave-safe utensils.* While some packaging films may be labelled 'microwave-safe' care should be taken to avoid direct contact with the food when using them to cover containers or to reheat dinners on plates.* As migration is more likely to occur into hot fatty foods, glass containers are a suitable choice for heating these products. As yet there are no standards for claims such as "microwave safe"; if you are in doubt as to the safety of such materials contact the manufacturer or use a ceramic/glass alternative.In the end, I guess time will tell as to what other possible adverse effects, microwave ovens may have on our lifes!

Oct 26, 2015 01:31 PM » posted by: Ali
"Copy Paste" response is blialirnt but he would do well not to plagiarise other peoples responses!!!!!!!!The fact is that exposure to microwave radiation for extended periods may well cause certain cancers to occur. They may also cause cataracts, birth defects and other serious health problems including nervous system damage, headaches, and pacemaker interference.However, new ovens are typically designed so as not to exceed 1mW/cm2 of radiated power. In addition, any leak that exceeds 5mW/cm2 at a distance of 2 inches from a microwave oven is considered to be dangerous and the oven should not be used. Ovens can deteriorate over time and should be checked to ensure that these limits are not exceeded.This can be done by your local service centre or you can purchase an earth leakage detector and have it on hand to keep a regular maintenance check of your oven. If an oven is in good condition then it would present no more risk then anything else around your home such as eating processed food, using mobile phones, living near HV power lines, or living in your house which exposes you to electromagnetic radiation from the electrical wiring. Also, as I had indicated in an earlier posting;the other aspect and some area of concern is the safety of eating foods from a microwave. This really depends on the containers used to heat the food in. Some plastics, for instance, are more prone to the effect of "migration". whereby some additives used in plastics are more likely to migrate to foods more than others. The main concern in the past has been in connection with plasticisers which are used to improve the flexibility of some packaging materials. As the tendency for plasticisers to migrate increases at higher temperatures, only those plastics specifically designed for oven use are suitable for cooking. To reduce any possible risk one should;* Use only microwave-safe utensils.* While some packaging films may be labelled 'microwave-safe' care should be taken to avoid direct contact with the food when using them to cover containers or to reheat dinners on plates.* As migration is more likely to occur into hot fatty foods, glass containers are a suitable choice for heating these products. As yet there are no standards for claims such as "microwave safe"; if you are in doubt as to the safety of such materials contact the manufacturer or use a ceramic/glass alternative.In the end, I guess time will tell as to what other possible adverse effects, microwave ovens may have on our lifes!

Jul 09, 2011 09:30 PM » posted by: Joyelle
Ab fab my godloy man.


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